Moog Releases "Subharmonicon" Semi-Modular Synthesizer


Moog Subharmonicon © Moog Music

If you were reading this magazine back a couple years ago, then you probably remember an article we did on Moogfest 2018, and one of its workshops where VIP attendees were gonna get to build what could potentially become another marketable product for Moog. After previous success with it's DFAM (Drummer From Another Mother), and Werkstatt builds, which went on to become hot sellers in their own right, synth enthusiasts had been eagerly awaiting to see if 2018's build, the "Subharmonicon", would also see the light of day. Well, it's happening folks! Indeed the Moog Subharmonicon is not only being marketed, but has seen a few upgrades and updates since the raw build of 2018 as well.


If you hadn't herd of it before, the Subharmonicon; a semi-modular synthesizer, is, as Moog states on it's website: "A brand-new electronic instrument inspired by the Trautonium, the Rythmicon, and the Schillinger System. It is a semi-modular harmonic kaleidoscope that divides into itself until everything that is up becomes down".


Some of the key basic features of the Subharmonicon are:


  • 2 analog VCOs and 4 suboscillators

  • 4-pole resonant lowpass filter and VCA with attack and decay controls

  • 2 x 4-step sequencer and polyrhythm generator produce complex sequences

  • Stack oscillators for 6-note pseudo-polyphony

  • Manual and clock-syncable tempo controls

  • Expansive 32-point patchbay for limitless tweakability

  • Complete 60HP Eurorack synthesizer that can easily be installed in a Eurorack case


Looking at the front panel, it's clear there has been a re-design in some ways of the front panel layout, with easier to see and more tactile oscillator and sequencer control knobs and buttons, and the addition of Attack on the envelopes for both the filter and amp. As for connectivity, please be aware that this is a bonafide analog semi-modular synthesizer, so no USB or MIDI I/O. Only connections provided on the back are 1/4" audio out, and for the power supply.


The Moog Subharmonicon is expected at retailers soon, with a pricepoint of $699.00. Get your pre-orders in fast if you would like to secure an early unit for yourself.



Please take a moment to watch the video below featuring Electronic music pioneer Suzanne Ciani, and multidisciplinary visual artist Scott Kiernan:



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